Egg-splaining Bakasana

Strengthen your arms, legs and abdomen.
Bakasana (birdpose) was re-named by my boys “baby handstands”.
It’s important to be able to feel the weight through the arms before you head towards lift off.
This practice will encourage you to learn to trust your arms, and connect the tail-bone towards the crown of the head, enabling this pose to take flight.
A posture journey through adho mukha svanasana (dog head down), uttanasana (forward bend) and malasana (garland pose), I hope this practice will bring a new insight into this beautiful little compact pose.

Contra-indications:
Pregnancy
Carpal tunnel syndrome

Sea where I teach

There is no instruction with this film, it was way too windy.
I thought it would be nice just for you to see one of our “home” beaches. Standing poses are presented here with a modified sun-salutation.
If you would like me to draw you some stick figures to go along with the video, pop me a message and I will email them back to you.

Yoga Unplanned – episode 3

I remember learning to take the weight on my arms for hand-stands during the yoga class, it was a pose that always made me want to leave the room.
My teacher would say “Just kick up!”. Of course, eventually I did.
This pose strengthens the arms, shoulders and wrists. Practice this with gentle repetition to gradually increase strength, so as to not strain the wrists etc.
Inversions are not advised through the Iyengar tradition during menstruation as it goes against the flow in the body at that time of the month.

Seated postures – crossed legs and kneeling

A deceptively deep practice. Who would have thought kneeling and crossed legs could be so much fun.
Padamasana (lotus pose) makes an appearance at the end (certainly not a requirement 🙂
The twists are very good for toning, releasing and lengthening the torso and pelvic area as long as you stay within your own capacity for movement.
Gently push your boundaries but not your limits.
If you have low back problems or knee issues, consult your Iyengar teacher first.
Practice with gentle awareness,
shine bright,
Lucy

Yoga Unplanned – episode 2 – Get moving again

Starting with a modified sun-salute as a gently dynamic way of easing into the beautiful side rotation of Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana. This pose will bring length to the hamstrings, spine, shoulders, lower back, and the sides of the abdomen. It provides a spinal twist that massages and stimulates the digestive system whilst also relieving fatigue. This pose brings me great joy and up-liftment.
Work within your own capacity

Shine Bright

Enjoy

NB: Not suitable suffering with low back pain or diarrhoea

Wake up your hips

Simple crossed leg and kneeling positions.
It was warm and this little sequence was the perfect way to get going on a lazy Sunday morning.
Stay gentle in your approach, observing a well lifted spine.
Follow the guidance of an experienced teacher if you have issues with your hips or knees.
Shine bright,
Enjoy!

Getting to know your hamstrings

These standing poses will wake up the back of the legs.
Give the poses and your legs time. Muscles take a while to increase their length, so, just like you would not expect your muscles to grow immediately (think Pop-eye) don’t expect to be as bendy as Olive oil immediately either.
The stretch should feel more like a wide stretch in the main part of the muscle rather than a sharp pointy stretching sensation at the top of the leg near the buttocks.
Keep each stretch within your own capacity and enjoy the sensation of fresher feeling legs.

Ease into the evening

I’m tired. I don’t feel like doing anything. I especially don’t feel like anyone looking at me…
These are the times when our practice can become a real friend. It whispers to you “relax, take your time, be gentle, take care, breathe smoothly, breathe quietly, becalm”

This practice is perfect as a post-work, pre-evening practice.
Be gentle , listen to your body and don’t push.
Enjoy

Standing poses and inversions

Using the wall for support brings a whole new clarity to the leg work in this practice.
The wall gives stability allowing our balance to come more naturally, allowing the feeling within each pose to go a little deeper.
Working from Utthita Trikonasana through to sarvaganasana this practice takes just over an hour. I tried to guide you through savasana so many times but the noise over the hedge was just too much this time. So please settle yourself for savasana well at the end of this session
Shine bright
Lucy

Please work to your own capacity and be gentle with yourself 🙂